Georgia Bar Celebrates 100 Years of Women Lawyers

, Daily Report

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Dorothy Beasley, the first female judge on the Georgia Court of Appeals, gave rousing remarks at a celebration of the 100th anniversary of women lawyers in Georgia.

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What's being said

  • William K. Travis

    William K. Aug 29, 2016 To the Editors: The history of women lawyers in Georgia is incomplete without recognition by the State Bar of Georgia and each of its members of those women who taught many of us how to practice law, how to be trial lawyers, and that lawyers must treat their sisters and brothers at the bar with respect, decency, and, at times, good humor. For those of us who had the privilege to practice in the Atlanta and Stone Mountain Circuits with Mildred L. Kingloff (admitted in 1930), Evelyn Sisk Fabian (admitted in 1934), Judge R. Pruden Herndon (admitted in 1943), Virginia A. Bips (admitted in 1946), Marjorie Thurman (admitted in 1949), and Marjorie King (admitted in 1950), we learned much from women who knew the meaning of hard work, creativity, and justice. Perhaps the Bar should assemble a collection of photographs of these pacesetters and ask those who knew them about their history. This would honor them well. We owe each of them a debt we can only repay by being respectful, honorable, and decent colleagues toward one another and true advocates for the justice system and our clients.

  • William K.

    To the Editors: The history of women lawyers in Georgia is incomplete without recognition by the State Bar of Georgia and each of its members of those women who taught many of us how to practice law, how to be trial lawyers, and that lawyers must treat their sisters and brothers at the bar with respect, decency, and, at times, good humor. For those of us who had the privilege to practice in the Atlanta and Stone Mountain Circuits with Mildred L. Kingloff (admitted in 1930), Evelyn Sisk Fabian (admitted in 1934), Judge R. Pruden Herndon (admitted in 1943), Virginia A. Bips (admitted in 1946), Marjorie Thurman (admitted in 1949), and Marjorie King (admitted in 1950), we learned much from women who knew the meaning of hard work, creativity, and justice. Perhaps the Bar should assemble a collection of photographs of these pacesetters and ask those who knew them about their history. This would honor them well. We owe each of them a debt we can only repay by being respectful, honorable, and decent colleagues toward one another and true advocates for the justice system and our clients.

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